Register your name, slogan, or logo today.

Protect your brand by registering your name or logo online in just minutes.
  • Quick and easy online questionnaire
  • We'll search the federal database for direct-hits
  • Preparation & filing of your trademark application with the USPTO
Start My Trademark Registration
98% of customers recommend our Trademark Registration service

How Trademark Engine works

Get your trademark registered in just 3 easy steps using our simple online questionnaire.
1

Answer a few questions

Complete our simple questionnaire to begin the registration process. Most people finish in as little as 7 minutes.

2

Compile application and search

We create the official application for you. Plus, we'll conduct a search to reveal direct-hit conflicts.

3

Application filing

Your completed application will be filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

Why get a trademark?

Most of the brands, logos and slogans you love, know and trust have been registered. A registered mark gives you a presumption of ownership and a presumed right to use the brand nationwide giving you broader protection in courts. Once registered, present yourself as an established and serious business with the ® symbol after your name, logo or slogan. Other benefits include:

  • Presumed validity of the mark if you have to sue
  • Additional remedies in court
  • May increase the value of your company

Why run a search for similar marks?

Before spending your time and money filing an application, you should do a search to see if your mark is already in use or registered by someone else. A search will help avoid obvious duplications of pre-existing marks. If the USPTO rejects your application, the fees to Trademark Engine and the USPTO are not refundable. If your company is just beginning, it’s better to make name changes now rather than invest in building a brand only to learn that you have to change the name and lose all of your goodwill. All packages include a free, federal direct-hit search.

Get started today. Select your Trademark Registration package.

Basic Package
$99+ USPTO filing fees

Direct-hit Search Direct-hit search of the federal USPTO database which will include misspellings for live and pending applications.

Federal E-Filing with USPTOElectronic filing of your application with the USPTO with no need to wait for mail or dealing with paper files

Electronic DeliveryElectronic delivery or your trademark application.

Standard Package
$149+ USPTO filing fees
Includes the everything from the Basic Package PLUS:

Cease & Desist Letter ($35 value)A customer-specific form you can further customize if someone is infringing on your mark.

Transfer/Assignment ($35 value)Custom assignment template. If you need to sell or otherwise convey your mark, you have access to your pre-filled in template that you can further customize.

Trademark Monitoring (6 Months - $88 value)Post-filing monitoring to notify you of possible infringers.

Deluxe Package
$199+ USPTO filing fees
Includes the everything from the Standard Package PLUS:

Trademark Monitoring (1 Year - $175 value)Post-filing monitoring to notify you of possible infringers.

24-hour Expedited ProcessingWe will review, prepare, and file your trademark application within 24 business hours after receiving your order, a $49 value. Normal processing time is 5 business days in our Basic and Standard packages.

Federal Trademark Registration FAQs
Still have questions? Call 1 (877) 721-4579 or LIVE CHAT with us for real-time support.

A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others another party. A “service” mark distinguishes the source of a service, rather than a good, but the two are typically simply referred to as a “trademark” or “mark”. In more general terms, getting a trademark protects your brand. Most of the brands, logos and slogans you love, know and trust have been properly registered.

By registering your trademark, you will be entitled to a presumption of ownership of the brand on a national level and a presumed right to use the brand nationwide. It prevents someone from registering a confusingly similar mark after you and allows you to sue in federal court if someone infringes on the brand you have worked hard to build. Once registered, you can also present yourself as an established and serious business because you can start using the ® symbol after your name, logo or slogan.

After you properly register the mark and use it for a five-year period, Trademark Engine can also help you file a “Declaration of Incontestability” giving you the greatest protection under U.S. trademark law. This will prevent others from contesting your trademark on grounds often subject to attack such as: (1) the mark is not inherently distinctive; (2) it is confusingly similar to another mark that someone else that began using before you; or (3) the mark is simply functional as opposed to identifying the source of the goods or services.

You can use special modifiers (like ‘in:’, ‘from:’, etc.) to focus results based on a channel, person, or date. Results can be filtered by recency, relevancy, and file type so you can easily find what you need.

Under U.S. law, you do establish what is known as “common law” when you use your name, logo or slogan in commerce even if you do not register it. So, why pay to register your trademark? Common law rights are limited to the geographic area where you actually use the mark as opposed to nationwide protection given to you when you register your mark. Without registration, you can be limited to using your mark geographically and not have the ability to expand. Likewise, if someone else is already using your mark in a limited geographic area, you can box them in by registering your mark. Plus, should you ever have to sue someone for trademark infringement, your registration gives you a leg up in court as to the validity of your mark and your date of usage. There are also remedies available to registered trademark owners in the event of litigation. Finally, when you let Trademark Engine file your trademark, once accepted, you will be on the USPTO database which discourages others from using your mark in the future. Future companies will know your mark is already spoken for and hopefully you can avoid any disputes.

Benefits to registering your mark:

  • Nationwide protection
  • Presumed validity of the mark if you have to sue
  • Additional remedies in court
  • May increase the value of your company
  • Registration with the USPTO will discourage others from trying to use your mark

If budget is not an issue, the answer is register them both. If you need to choose, then, generally speaking, you should start with your name. To the extent someone is going to use something of yours, it is more likely they will try to use your name. Protecting your name gives you the broadest protection because it prevents any use of it that is causes confusion, even if they someone tries try to use your name within their logo. To protect your name, you protect it as a “standard character mark” without any notation as to the font, coloring or any styling.

A mark for your logo protects the exact shape, orientation, stylization and sometimes color in that particular logo. The company name can, but does not have to be part of the logo. Registering it the logo protects the logo it and prevents others from using that logo it or something confusingly similar to the logo. If you change your logo, and want that protected, too, you will have to file a new application. You are much more likely to change your logo, than your name.

To give you an example of a registered logo dispute, ExxonMobil filed suit against Fox for their use of the FXX Network logo because of the interlocking X’s.

The case settled right before trial.

If within your budget, you get the maximum protection when your register both your name and your logo. Each filing requires its own filing fees per class and fees to Trademark Engine.

Much like the availability of a corporate name in your state does not mean you have superior trademark rights to use the name in commerce, the availability of the domain name is not an indication either. A company could have a trademark name on a product or service, but not have acquired the domain name.

The availability of the domain name should be one part of a comprehensive search, which Trademark Engine can perform for you, to determine the strength of your brand name or slogan and the likelihood of succeeding in trademarking on the domain name.

If you have been using a domain name as part of a brand that sells goods or services, you may have established common law trademark rights. Under U.S. law, you do establish what is known as “common law” when you use your name, logo or slogan in commerce even if you do not register it. Common law rights are limited to the geographic area where you actually use the mark as opposed to nationwide protection given to you when you register your mark.

Without registration, you can be limited to using your mark geographically and not have the ability to expand. Likewise, if someone else is already using your mark in a limited geographic area, you can box them in by registering your mark. Plus, should you ever have to sue someone for trademark infringement, your registration gives you a leg up in court as to the validity of your mark and your date of usage. There are also remedies available to registered trademark owners in the event of litigation. Finally, when you let Trademark Engine file your trademark, once accepted, you will be on the USPTO database which discourages others from using your mark. Future companies will know your mark is already spoken for and hopefully you can avoid any disputes.

When you are investing heavily in a marketing campaign with a slogan, you should consider registering your slogan as well. You can also register short catch phrases or sayings when you are selling them as part of merchandise like shirts or hats. The same rules apply that are applicable to picking your company name. Namely, the slogan should be inherently distinctive and creative or have developed a secondary meaning. In other words, you probably can’t protect “really good pizza” unless that saying has become so famous that most consumers associate it with a certain pizza brand.

The whole process will take anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes. For a typical application, be prepared to provide at least the following:

  • The actual mark you want to use.
  • Be prepared to disclaim any part of the mark that may, on its own, not be registrable. Read more here.
  • The full legal name and address of the owner of the mark.
  • A copy of the specimen which is an example that shows you are using the mark in commerce. This could be a picture of your product or a website advertising your service.
  • The International Class you plan to use, which are listed here and on a drop down menu in our system, and a description of your good and services.
  • The date you first used the mark in commerce and the date you first shared the mark anywhere.

Even if you are the first to use a name, you need to be strategic. Think of the name as a sliding scale between not able to trademark it and easily able to trademark it. On the left side of the spectrum (or the not trademarkable side) are generic names. For example, you could not trademark the name “The Screwdriver Company” if you made screwdrivers. Likewise, we could not name this service “Online Trademark Filing Company” and get a trademark registration.

Almost as problematic as generic names are merely descriptive names. Hence, “The Strong Screwdriver Company” is also not likely to pass muster with the USPTO. Descriptive marks are only entitled to trademark protection if they have gained secondary meaning. That is a legal term of art that means they have become so famous that despite the generic nature, the public associates the product with a specific company. Examples include American Airlines or General Motors. If you aren’t that famous, you should not rely upon a secondary meaning to get your generic name through. If you are that famous, you likely have an army of lawyers. Geographic names often run into trouble and are considered descriptive. “Southwest Screwdrivers” is likely to run into a challenge. Of course, Southwest Airlines has become famous enough to have a secondary meaning.

After descriptive and generic names, your chances of being able to register a name starts to improve dramatically. The next on that scale is the suggestive mark. These hint at the quality or another aspect of the company such as “Herculean Screwdriver Company.” It is better than “Strong Screwdriver,” but conveys the same meaning. These you can usually register, but you run the risk that the USPTO says what you thought was suggestive was actually descriptive. Some popular examples include Microsoft which makes software for microcomputers or Citibank for financial services. Brand owners often like these names because it gives the consumer a good idea of what the company does without having to educate them or spending a lot on advertising to get them used to the name for the particular product or service.

Next on the list are arbitrary marks. These are existing words used in a way unrelated to their normal everyday meanings. Hence, Chocolate Screwdrivers may work. The textbook example of the arbitrary mark is Apple Computers - not to be confused with Apple Records.

Finally, fanciful marks are the easiest to get through the USPTO. A fanciful mark is a made up word or a very rarely used word that has nothing to do with describing the products. “Glotz” for a screwdriver company may work. You are likely familiar with Yahoo!, Google, Exxon and Spotify which would all be considered fanciful marks.

The USPTO may reject your name because it is similar to another name already registered. That is why you should run a search before you file because if the USPTO rejects your application, the fees to Trademark Engine and the USPTO are not refundable. In addition to being too similar to another name, the mark may be rejected because it is a surname, it is geographically descriptive of where you are doing business, is disparaging (think of the current challenge to the Washington Redskins football team), it is a foreign term that translates to a generic or descriptive english term, it uses an individual’s name or likeness, or is the title of a single book or movie.

Allow Trademark Engine to assist you with your comprehensive trademark search.

In the most general sense, getting a registered trademark protects your brand. By registering a trademark with the U.S Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), you will be entitled to a presumption of ownership of the brand and business name on a national level and a presumed right to use it nationwide. It prevents someone from registering a confusingly similar trademark after you and allows you to sue in federal court if someone infringes on the brand you have worked hard to build. Once you file a trademark application and register a trademark, you can present yourself as an established and serious business because you can start using the ® symbol after your name, logo or slogan. We can help you through this process by assisting you with your trademark application. The process begins with us performing a trademark search and then creating and filing your trademark application with the USPTO. The federal trademark registration process has never been so easy. Let us help you today.

Take action to protect your name today.

Thousands have protected their brand by filing a trademark.
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